Monday, May 27, 2013

App Review: Speech FlipBook


When I heard about Tactus Therapy's new App, Speech FlipBook, I was immediately intrigued.  As a pediatric therapist, I am always on the lookout for new tools that will allow me to be a more efficient therapist, and I suspected that the Speech FlipBook would be one of those tools.  And it turns out, I was right!

As Tactus Therapy clearly states in their introduction to Speech FlipBook, this app isn't a therapy program; in other words, it's not designed to be given to a child to use independently. It doesn't have fancy graphics, songs, or games.  But what it does have is so much more.

Speech FlipBook is wonderfully versatile tool for systematically creating sound and word lists to be used to address speech sound disorders such as apraxia and dysarthria.  It's also a great tool for developing phonological awareness skills.  By far, the best thing about Speech FlipBook is the flexible, thorough nature of the app. Using the settings carefully designed by Tactus Therapy, you can use this app to create words lists with any type of given criteria. Want words that just begin with bilabial (lip) sounds? Okay! Want words that only have "oo" and "ee" vowels? You got it! Words that have bilabial (lip) sounds in the initial (beginning) position of a word, "oo" and "ee" vowels in the middle, and tongue tip alveolar sounds (t, d, n) in the final position of a words? Sure thing. Want real words? Okay! Want non-words? You bet. Truly, I am amazed by how much thought must have gone into creating this app to make it so easy to generate word lists given highly specific criteria.


Once you've created the word lists that fit your specifications, you can quickly flip through those words lists during intervention sessions. I love, love, LOVE the fact that you can flip either the whole word (moon, beat, boot) OR flip one sound at a time. Say, for example, you had a child who was working on producing /t/ final words.  You could set the app to generate words that end only in "t." Then, you could choose to just flip through the different beginning phonemes but leave the vowel and "t" the same (wheat, neat, heat, feet, seat, cheat, meet), or you could choose to leave the initial and final consonant the same and just flip the vowel (meet, mat, mutt, met, mitt). OR you could choose to change the initial consonant and the vowel, but leave the final /t/ in place.  Fabulous flexibility.


So where do I see using this nifty app for speech and language intervention? There are a wide variety of ways; generating and using words lists for articulation/phonology therapy and working on phonological awareness are just the tip of the iceberg. Personally, I see this app being the most helpful when working with children who have a diagnosis of developmental apraxia of speech.  One of the defining characteristics of apraxia of speech is difficulty in combining sounds into syllables and words.  Children with apraxia of speech benefit from intervention that is systematically designed to address this core deficit.  So, when I am working with children who have a diagnosis of apraxia of speech, I change only one aspect of a word first.  For example, after establishing production of consonant vowel (CV) and consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel (CVCV) syllables, I begin to work on words with consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) syllable shape.  The trick, though, is that I don't just work on any old CVC word; on the contrary, I pick CVC words in a precise and systematic way. I chose words that contain phonemes the child is able to produce and then... 
  • First, I pick words have the same consonant in both initial and final position (mom),until the child has mastered production of those words
  • Then, I pick words that have the same place of articulation but differ only in manner (mop),until the child has mastered production those words
  • Then, I pick words that transition from one place to another in place of articulation, but only stick to one movement pattern - say, bilabial (m, p, b) to alveolar (n, t, d).  This gives me words like man, pan, mad, bad, etc. 
  • Then I move to another movement pattern - often alveolar to bilabial (tap, dip). And so on.
Speech FlipBook is clearly an amazing match for an intervention program like this - with this app, it is super duper easy to systematically select and maneuver through these target words during treatment sessions. Further, Speech FlipBook allows the user to hear the individual sounds in each word (d...i...p) and/or to hear the word blended together (dip); this can be a useful way for children with apraxia of speech to work toward blending the sounds together into a word.  And, the user also has the option of recording his production of the word for playback. This is a fantastic way to provide a child with immediate and powerful feedback about his/her word production.

There are only a couple real drawbacks to this app. The first is that it doesn't contain pictures, so, if you are using it to obtain independent productions from an individual, that individual needs to be a reader.  This limits the use of this app with preschoolers. However, I still use the app to help myself generate words lists to be used with preschoolers - I just generate pictures off of those word lists to be used with the child.  The second drawback is that this app is limited to words that are one syllable. While it is powerful tool for children with apraxia of speech, it is not the only tool an SLP needs to generate words for this population, as it does not include multi-syllabic words.

In the end, though, Speech FlipBook is absolutely a wonderful tool to have in my SLP toolbox.  It provides me with the means to make my therapy sessions  more efficient for a variety of children on my caseload and is a fantastic addition to the apps on which I rely as a pediatric SLP.



Advertising Disclaimer: Tactus Therapy provided me with a free version of Speech FlipBook to review. However, my opinions about the products I blog about are my own.

2 comments:

  1. nice article. It is very interesting and informative for a father like my self. I will definitely forward this one to my cousin who has a child with speech disorder. Will be checking out your other speech therapy related posts. :)

    Brisbane Speech Therapy

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  2. Speech FlipBook is a very nice and versatile tool, whole the blog is very informative for doing many works, thanks for sharing such a wonderful blog with us.
    Flipbook

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